Battle at Bukit Timah

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Bukit Timah Battle

On 10 February 1942, the Japanese launched constant incursions on Bukit Timah. There was a counter-attack by the Allied forces on the same day but were soon defeated at the hands of the Japanese and forced to retreat to the Race-course at night. This retreat gave the Japanese an upper hand: they could advance all the way down to Bukit Timah Village and had captured it by midnight of 10 February 1942. On 11 February, Bukit Timah Hill was taken but Percival refused to surrender. Instead, he withdrew his forces to point 226 at Bukit Chandu, setting the stage for the final battle for Singapore.

At dusk on 10 February 1942, the Japanese launched simultaneous incursions on Bukit Timah. The 5th Division advanced from Choa Chu Kang Road while the 18th Division advanced from Jurong Road. On the same day, LG Percival launched a counter-attack, led by the 22nd Australian Brigade, and the 12th and 15th Indian Brigades. The counter-attack sought to recapture the Jurong-Kranji Line. However, the 22nd Australian Brigade was weak and in a bad shape as some of its troops were still trying to find their way back to the brigade after the Japanese invasion of 8 February 1942. However, despite little artillery support and constant attacks by Japanese low-flying aircraft, the brigade fought stoutly and successfully destroyed a few tanks.

That being said, the Allied forces were no match for the Japanese. Forced to abandon the counter- attack, the Allied troops withdrew to the Race- course at night. This withdrawal allowed the Japanese troops and tanks to advance down Bukit Panjang junction towards Bukit Timah Village. By midnight of 10 February 1942, the Japanese had captured the village. On 11 February 1942, Bukit Timah Hill fell to the Japanese. On the same day, LG Yamashita invited the British to surrender but Percival held on and withdrew his forces to a new 28-mile long perimeter line at Bukit Chandu, setting the stage for the last and final batte for Singapore, the battle at Pasir Panjang.


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