Intangible Cultural Heritage

Dragon Kilin

Traditional Craftsmanship

16 results found.

  • Making of Wood-Fired Pottery

    pottery making

    The production of traditional wood-fired pottery using dragon kilns draws on millennia of pottery traditions in China. Dragon kilns, mainly Hokkien and Teochew kilns, were constructed in Singapore in the early 1900s by migrants from South China.

  • Making of Chinese Paper Offerings

    The practice of burning of Chinese paper offerings dates as far back as the Song Dynasty in China. Paper offerings are burnt for the deceased and deities particularly during occasions such as the Hungry Ghost Festival.

    The practice of burning of Chinese paper offerings dates as far back as the Song Dynasty in China. Paper offerings are burnt for the deceased and deities particularly during occasions such as the Hungry Ghost Festival.

  • Making of Soya Sauce

    Chinese sauces, such as soya sauce, have been made in Singapore for around a century.

  • Weaving Ketupat

    Weaving of Ketupat

    Ketupat is a rice cake wrapped with coconut leaves. Rice is a staple food for many communities in Southeast Asia. For the Malay community, there are several ways that rice is served- and ketupat is one of the ways where rice is cooked in small pouches made from young coconut leaves. The use of coconut leaves is a commonly found example of traditional food packaging found in the region.

  • Hawker Culture

    hawkerculture2-1

    Hawker culture in Singapore can be traced back to street hawkers and the hawker centres which were first built to resettle street hawkers in the 1970s.

  • Rangoli

    Rangoli, which means “an array of colours” in Sanskrit, is a traditional Indian art form dating back some 5,000 years to the pre-Aryan period. It is known as kolam in Tamil.

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