Colonial History Trail

Estimated trail distance: 2 km

3 loved this Trail

Fort Canning Centre

Colonial History Trail

3 loved this Trail

Estimated trail distance: 2 km

  1. Fort Canning Centre
Category
Nature
Organised by
National Parks Board
Number of points
1
Estimated trail distance
2 km

Fort Canning Hill is one of Singapore's most historic landmarks. It was believed that the palaces of ancient Malay rulers stood on the summit of this one 'Forbidden Hill'. It was here that Sir Stamford Raffles built his bungalow. The hill also became an important communication centre, housing key communication devices such as the flagstaff, time ball, lighthouse and a telegraph office.

The hill was converted into a fort in 1860 and renamed Fort Canning in honour of Viscount Charles John Canning, Governer-General and first Viceroy of India. In the 1920s and 1930s, the hill was transformed into an artillery fort with barracks, officers' quarters, old gunpowder magazine and a hospital. An underground bunker was also constructed during the period.

As you embark on this trail, soak in the hill's heritage while admiring the colonial structures standing in the park today.

Trail Points

  1. Fort Canning Centre
  2. Nine-pound Cannon and South Battery
  3. Singapore's First Experimental and Botanical Garden
  4. Old Townscape
  5. Heritage Tree - Ear-pod Tree (Enterolobium cyclocarpum)
  6. Bond Terrace
  7. Government House and Fort Canning Hill
  8. Signing of the Treaty in 1824
  9. Raffles House and Raffles Terrace
  10. Time Ball
  11. Heritage Tree - Flame of the Forest (Delonix regia)
  12. Lighthouse
  13. Broad-leafed Fig, Elephant Ear Fig Tree (Ficus auriculata)
  14. Flagstaff
  15. Tree Appreciation
  16. Fort Canning Service Reservoir
  17. Fort Gate
  18. Remnants of Fort Wall
  19. Old Gunpowder Magazine
  20. Hotel Fort Canning
  21. Canning Walk
  22. Sally Point
  23. Underground Bunker
  24. First Christian Cemetery
  25. James Brooke Napier Memorial
  26. Cupolas
  27. Spice Garden
  28. Stamford Green - 19th-century Gateway to Fort Canning Park